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UNIVERSITY ADDRESSES NATIONAL NURSING SHORTAGE.

Campaign gifts supporting faculty like Paul Krogue advance teaching and research that benefit students and communities.

Paul Krogue graduated from Montana State’s College of Nursing in 2007. After providing onsite clinical education in a critical care environment in Great Falls, Krogue completed his doctoral degree at the University of Arizona. In 2012, Krogue returned to MSU as a faculty member to help launch the university’s Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program. 

The ABSN program is designed for applicants who have successfully completed a bachelor’s degree in a discipline other than nursing. The program begins in May each year and concludes the following year in August, with an intense curriculum designed to address the nationwide nursing shortage.  

“The fact that MSU supports this accelerated nursing program provides benefits on a lot of different levels,” Krogue said. “A lot of our graduates stay here locally. They work or Indian Health Services. They work in community settings. They are taking care of Montanans.”

Nontraditional students return to school with a variety of life experiences and job histories. While the ABSN program fosters a supportive and dynamic learning environment, ABSN enrollees still face challenges. Many have families and mortgages, and they’ve already absorbed the financial burden of their previous degree. Scholarship gifts inspired by the What It Takes campaign have been instrumental in helping ABSN students achieve success. 

“Montana State University is a land-grant university, and we’re here serving the working men and women of Montana,” Krogue said. “Being able to provide financial support to our students is often the very thing that allows them to be successful.”